Gardener’s Almanac

Gardeners Almanac

“Today is the day when bold kites fly,

When cumulus clouds roar across the sky.

When robins return, when children cheer,

When light rain beckons spring to appear.

It is a wonderful, spring-y, windy day today. A week ago it was snowing, sleeting and generally acting quite wintery. One week later almost all but our deepest snow drifts are GONE, and spring is here! Here is a list of birds that showed up in our neck of the woods on Monday last. As you read it, imagine the sounds of spring these visitors brought with them.

2 squadrons of geese, scores of robins (I felt like it was RAINING ROBINS!), eagles, 4 hawks circling, Red Winged blackbirds, house finches, sandhill cranes, we heard a turkey gobbling in the woods – and of course add to that the spring songs of our loyal chickadees, goldfinches, cardinals and woodpeckers… Wonderful! What a day. Oh – two days later bluebirds showed up! Spring is here, and I am a happy camper.

Robins woke the sun up this morning at 6:30 a.m. Those same robins will be singing the sun to sleep this evening at 7:47 p.m. Can you believe it? We are enjoying 13 hours and 16 minutes of daylight now.

The April Pink Moon will be full on the 15th, Which is Tuesday of Holy Week. We are all about the moon this month – do you remember these historical events that happened in April, 1972? Yes, I know, it dates us doesn’t it? I clearly remember the news during this amazing time.

On April 20, 1972, the lunar module of Apollo XVI landed on the moon with astronauts John Young and Charles Duke aboard. Thomas Mattingly remained in orbit around the moon aboard the command module. This was the third exploration of the moon. One day later on April 21, 1972, Apollo XVI astronauts John Young and Charles Duke drove an electric car (LEM) on the surface of the moon. It’s still up there along with some expensive tools and some film that they forgot.

April’s full moon is special because of the eclipse at that time – a total lunar eclipse is quite an event. The Old Farmer’s Almanac tells us that “On April 14-15, the lunar eclipse will be visible throughout the United States and Canada. The partial phase begins at 1:58 A.M.; totality starts at 3:06 A.M. Only the western states will see the end of the event.”

Remember the earth science classes in school where we learned that the moon produces no light of its own? We see the moon because it reflects sunlight; it is illuminated by the sun. When the Earth blocks the sun’s light from reaching the moon, we see a lunar eclipse. There are three types of lunar eclipses: partial, penumbral and total. The most rare occurance is a total eclipse as the  sun, moon and Earth must be perfectly lined up at a time when the moon is also full.

One article I read said this about next week’s lunar eclipse: “At the peak of a full lunar eclipse the moon will appear blood red, making it the most breathtaking as well – hence the name “Blood Moon”. Though on average there are 1.5 occurrences per year of an eclipse (some years up to 3 total eclipses can happen), you also have to be in the right place and hope there is no cloud cover.”

There is more to note about this particular full moon, Christian friends. Next week’s eclipse will be more than just a Blood Moon. There have been a few times in history when a Blood Moon occurs on 4 consecutive Feasts days – God’s feast days that he instituted in Leviticus 23. This rare combination of events is called “A Blood Moon Tetrad (BMT)”.

There have been 7 BMTs since Jesus Christ’s first coming. Every single BMT has brought a significant event to the Jewish people within a year of the first or last eclipse of the tetrad. In the most recently noted BMTs we saw: 1949-1950; 1948 Israel becomes a state again, with the Israeli war armistice in 1949, and 1967-1968 when Jerusalem was captured by Israel in 1967 as the result of the 6-day war.

Those were extremely important events related to Biblical prophecy and the End Times calendar. So take note of this – the next BMT occurs on Passover April 15, 2014, Feast of Tabernacles Oct. 8, 2014, Passover April 4, 2015 and Tabernacles Sep. 28, 2015.

The information I found about the coming Tetrad says to add to the list a total solar eclipse on March 20, 2015 – the day of Jewish New Year and a partial solar eclipse on Sep. 13, 2015 on the Feast of Trumpets. If we add the recent ISON Comet’s appearance back  on the first day of Hannukah, 2013,  we have 7 ‘signs in the sun, moon and stars’ falling on Jewish Holidays within a 2 year period. The writer’s conclusion was “I think God is trying to show us something!”

Hmmmm. Maybe he is right. It is worth looking into, friends, and being alert to God’s ‘signs in the heavens’. Wake up! Have your lamps trimmed and filled with oil! No one is predicting the end of the world or is setting a date for the Lord’s return, but this sure can be a wake-up call for us as we pray for God’s will to be done “on earth as it is in heaven.”

We have the most important week of the whole year coming up – Passover, Holy Week and Resurrection Day! I love this season. One of my favorite desserts is this Lemon Dessert that I somehow always associated with spring. It is easy, light and… springy!

Lemon Dessert

1 cup flour

1 stick (1//2 cup) butter, softened

1 8 oz. cream cheese, softened

9 oz. Cool Whip (or larger)

3 cups milk

1 cup chopped pecans

1 cup powdered sugar

2 pkg. instant lemon pudding

Chopped nuts

Mix flour, butter and pecans. Press into a 9 x 13 in. pan. Bake 25 minutes at 325 degrees. Cool. Mix cream cheese, powdered sugar and 1 cup Cool Whip. Spread carefully over crust. Mix pudding and milk. Spread over cream cheese mixture. Top with remaining Cool Whip. Top with a few chopped nuts. Refrigerate.

 

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Joan Tyvoll is founder and president of Rivers Apostolic Center. She is a faith coach, writer and speaker, and has over 40 years of experience ministering to individuals, small groups and congregations. Joan loves to teach, train and coach people with hungry hearts. Contact Joan at 715.772.3345 or email her with questions on this blog